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Struggling to Find Your Ideal Career Path? These Tips Will Help You Sort It Out


One of the most common trends we see with millennials today is that they all seemed to be quitting their jobs after working for a year or two and then find some other jobs that will satisfy not only their salary expectations but their soul too. Most of us realize that the career we may have pre-determined when we’re still young and students are not exactly the career we’ve wanted to pursue all along. This is where we start having an identity-crisis and we venture on a journey to find ourselves.

What really is our goal and purpose in this world? What career path should we carve out for ourselves? Does it have to be in-lined with our passion and hobbies? What if you’re still struggling and at lost at what your career path should be? To some of us, we don’t even know what we really want, that’s why we can’t think of career path to follow. How can we ever move forward? Here are our top tips to help you find your ideal career path.

Use the G-P-V Formula to Find Your Perfect Match

Most of us use this formula in finding the correct career path we want to set in our life. However, most of us didn’t realize that we’re already using the G-P-V formula since we just feel like it’s our instinct kicking in. However, for those people who didn’t know how to use this, we’ll explain it further for you to understand. GPV stands for:

  • (G)ifts
  • (P)assions
  • (V)alues

When you think about your career path, you should start sorting out your qualities  that falls into that list. Gifts refer to your strength. What are your strengths and abilities? What skills or subjects do you excel? Start listing it down. When you’re done, the next thing you need to determine is which areas of work interests or excites you. This is where you get that thrilling feeling like you’re in an adventure that you can’t wait to discover or embark on.

List those areas or activities or even work that interests you as well. When you’re done, think of the values you want to impart or message you want to convey to the world. Do you want to make a difference? List it down too. When you’re done, you’ll start seeing a convergence among the three areas. And that convergent line is actually your ideal career path!

An Example of a Convergent Line Career Path

For example, let’s say your skills lies in language and words. You have this unique talent of combining words in order to create a beautiful prose and meaningful and memorable lines. You find yourself excelling in the subject English. Your grammar, writing, and speaking skills are excellent. Your passion or areas of interests lies in writing stories and reading books. And now, the messages and values you want to convey can be done in a written medium. It can be done in your novels or stories. Since you can now see a convergence or common area in all three areas, then you can now think of a work that is in line of your passion. An example for this is you might be interested in applying in a publishing house since it all aligns to your passion.

Take a Look At the Options You’ve Never Considered Before

In any case your primary choice didn’t succeed, you might want to start looking for other options. Maybe that path just isn’t for you. The next thing you can do is to look on the second, third, or even fourth options of your strength. You might think that it’s pointless to pursue them since you only have an average skills on it, but you don’t really know until you try. We recommend you to take that leap of faith and start venturing on other opportunities.

Who knows, this may be the true path laid for you. For some people, starting a business might be a tedious and risky tasks for them, but then they became successful on it afterward. Based on the example above, you might start having a buy and sell online bookstore. In this way, you might not end up as an author but your business or interest is still in lieu with books and literature.

 

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